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Nah. Nah.
When we gonna stop chastising black people for being human, by that I mean flawed and capable of making mistakes - like everyone else of all colors and ethncities, and start holding society accountable for being structurally discriminant or hold cops accountable for using excessive force when unnecessary?
Lets start with this question, “What came first: Peaceful protesting or the rioting or the extra-judicial killing of unarmed black teenagers/men/women?” Then how is any reaction not a situational example of cause and effect?
Rioting may not be the correct action, but it is a human response to constant and repetitive systematic injustices endured by black people all over this country.
So please explain how this chastising black people is going to garner change overall? We all know it won’t. Because they’re not the cause. We see the effects though. How we perceive those effects is the major issue here.
When black people chastize other black folks for not being “respectable negroes” how is this not about gaining the sympathy of those white folks who really don’t care otherwise? That’s what it seems like to me.
Also what make this any different from the same prejudices that got the people of Ferguson here, if you’re only directing all of your attention to the actions of a few despite the larger group of protesters whose response is much in-line with what seems an appropriate response to this?
It speaks volumes that Obama has no problem chastizing the percieved shortcomings of black people, but cannot chastize police for killing unarmed black people.
The truth is: Even if we were a race of morally perfect black people you all know just as well as I do it won’t change how the system works or a prejudiced mindset. Only that person who has prejudiced views can change their mindset. And it takes ALL OF US to change the system.
So let’s stop kicking marginalized black folks when they’re already down, by getting distracted by the actions of a few and letting that completely undermine the brave and desperate actions of a terrorized community.

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Intro: I wrote this two days after the Cotto vs Martinez middleweight title fight in hopes that it would be published for a site that I freelance for. Ultimately, it didn’t make the cut as the site had an article already written, so I decided to post it here so that it would get some visibility and/or feedback.   

As the first bell rang for the much anticipated middleweight title bout between Sergio Martinez and Miguel Cotto, no one predicted this fight to be so one sided. After a few moments of feeling each other out, Martinez was jolted as Cotto’s signature left hook cracked against his right cheek.  Martinez, noticeably stunned, hobbled to the corner with Cotto charging in. The crowd howled in excitement as Cotto sent a clear message to Martinez and spectators alike. Cotto was there to unseat Martinez from his Middleweight throne.

Martinez’s last fight was a foreshadowing. He faced an accomplished but limited Martin Murray in his homeland of Argentina. Martinez struggled, but was effective enough to eke out a controversial decision. He got the benefit of the doubt – both in the fight and in public opinion – and possibly home cookin’. The performance was recognized as a fluke, considering his injuries and his past performances. Compared to last Saturday night, it was no fluke.

Over the duration of the fight with Cotto, one thing became apparent: Martinez would never be the same.  The first indication was that Martinez started the fight with his guard up - even before the first punch was thrown. That is stylistically unusual for Martinez. He didn’t seem as sharp as expected. His footwork was cluttered and stiff. He couldn’t move in and out or laterally; at least not as smoothly as we’re used to seeing from him. Was this a result of his knees being unable to support the kind of movement Martinez has relied on in the past?

The 3rd and 4th rounds were Martinez’s strongest. He seemed to be effective in utilizing his right jab and bested Cotto’s jab in their exchanges.  He felt comfortable enough to drop his hands. He began throwing lead lefts. At one point, Martinez did his usual shoulder shrug to signal he had the upper hand.

As the fight went on, it became clear that his level of comfort was only temporary. Cotto readjusted brilliantly by using Martinez’s right jab, lead lefts and spacing against him. Cotto kept just out of Martinez’s range to cause overextension. Cotto responded to those overextensions by dashing in or ducking under, countering with combinations to the head and body. Cotto seemed to concentrate more on the body attack. This effectively took whatever spring remained in Martinez legs out of the fight.

By the 7th round, Cotto had figured Martinez out. He cut off the ring, landed several lead punches of his own, got the best of the exchanges and completely out boxed Martinez. The defensively underrated Cotto was as sharp as Ginsu knife in all facets. The once great Martinez looked like he didn’t belong. With his bad knees, Martinez couldn’t get leverage for power. Even though it’s never really been his game, Martinez’s knees also killed his ability to fight inside.  That would’ve been the only way for him to turn the fight around. Martinez never answered the bell for the 10th round.

Martinez didn’t look like the class A fighter that he mocked Cotto for not beating. He didn’t look like the pound for pound superstar that would systematically dismantle his opponents before knocking them out late in fights. Cotto on the other hand, shined brighter than ever. On his home turf away from home, it was one of, if not the best performance of Cotto’s career.

Martinez was a phenom. The natural ability and talent he possessed afforded him shortcuts that many other boxers aren’t able to take.  He exploded out of obscurity to quickly become recognized as one of boxing’s pound for pound best.  That same natural ability and talent were catalysts to his unorthodox style, which relied heavily on athleticism and reflexes. Most of his opposition was outclassed on those attributes alone.  The majority of his opponents dependent on boxing fundamentals were broken down and eventually knocked out during his reign as middleweight champ.

So why would fundamentals be important to a fighter like Martinez? Fighting with his hands down, allows him to bait counter opportunities and strike with his thunderous overhand lefts or crushing right hooks. His success unintentionally mocks the conventional methods of boxing. It was his unorthodox style that gave him the freedoms from which his opponents, shackled by the fundamentals, were limited by.

Unfortunately for Martinez, the styles that rely on pure athleticism always deteriorate as their employers age. We’ve seen this before with Roy Jones, Jr. Even Muhammad Ali qualifies after his speed and reflex seemed to slow. The fundamentals allowed him to revert to the rope-a-dope.

Martinez, just like Roy Jones, is a reminder that pure athleticism without strong fundamentals in boxing will eventually betray you. They can get you to the top of the mountain, but fundamentals provide you the longevity stay a little bit longer.  Ultimately, Father Time conquers all.

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A question was posed to me about that scathing Deadspin article on Floyd Mayweather’s several domestic violence issues. I must admit, I didn’t know how to answer. Does that mean that I find domestic abuse acceptable? …Absolutely not.  At the same time, that had nothing to do with what made me a Mayweather fan to begin with in part, because I wasn’t initially aware that they existed.

Those incidents coupled with the recent condescendingly patriarchal posts Floyd’s made directed at women do make it difficult to justify my own fandom at times.  It’s a perplexing intersection between sports and reality, and juxtaposes being a fan of what a person does in competition against our assumptions of who they are as a person outside of competition.  I don’t know if there is right answer, let alone an answer that can satisfy those who strongly disapprove of Mayweather fandom despite his transgressions.

At the same time, I live in this area. Ray Rice has done many things for the community and several times has gone above the call of duty in his efforts. These things are not lost on the people of Baltimore, even if outsiders are unaware.  His humanitarian efforts and charity works have really endeared him to the people here.  I wouldn’t expect people miles away to understand or be aware of this relationship. This incident is highly unusual and uncharacteristic of Ray Rice as far as we know. Before this he has never really had issues off the field or on them.  

So maybe this is about forgiveness.  Maybe the fans of Baltimore are willing to forgive him more quickly than those observing from a distance.  We are not the country of second chances that we purport to be and I think recognizing that can be eye opening when people make mistakes or act unethically, immorally, etc.  Also, depending on the relationship with a person who has acted in any of those ways, it can make it easier or harder to accept their faults and forgive them. I’m not the most religious person, but that is one quality that is the most admirable about Jesus. That is one of the most difficult things to do in life because we are all selfish in that way.

When people act in those ways, we (me included) grab the pitchforks, torches, and noose. Accountability and accepting responsibility are two things my mother instilled in me and I believe that is why I respond to it that way, but I am also thinking about how she taught me forgiveness, too. That is the most powerful gift you can give to someone (and yourself, if you are the victim).  We are selfish and afraid that it will be used against us by facilitating some perceived weakness and vulnerability to be taken advantage of. Sometimes that happens, but not necessarily every time.  

My mom beat my ass when I deserved it. Thank god she was able to talk with me and show forgiveness afterwards, or else I wouldn’t have been able to understand that people can learn to do better when their errors are pointed out to them. However if they aren’t given the opportunity to do better; how can they?

I will say one last thing. We are mighty strong in our convictions, I understand and accept that. However, if our issue is with penalties enforced by the NFL in regards to Ray Rice aren’t compensatory; how many people are strong enough in their convictions to turn off the T.V. on Thursday, Sunday and Monday Nights? I think that is where you’ll find me in my Mayweather fandom, stuck in a perpetual cycle of admiration and disgust.  

Additional Post:
I hear you. I just think he’s like family to Baltimore. The thing about that is sometimes fandom can emulate love. And showing love to people in their weakest and darkest moments is the most humane thing you can do for a person. Not only when it’s the easiest and most convenient. I understand though, people should be disgusted and if the whole world has yet to forgive Rice - it’s okay. But it should also be okay to forgive him, too.


Detroit Water by ewillies

elegantly-tasteless:

miaadamswhat:

geejayeff:

scandal-whipped:

Detroit activist slams reporter on air for misreporting reasons for water shutoff to thousands

OMG you all have to watch this.

She’s my HERO!

DAYUM! She shut that FOX-reporter-wannabe down. Not here for that mess at all!

Bloop

I’m tryna be her when I grow up

Hank didn’t like that.

(via atane)

Source: scandal-whipped

Why Do We Blame the Victim?: We Don’t Want to Face Our Responsibility and Privilege

Source: azspot

blackhistoryalbum:

Muhammad Ali and Sam Cooke

blackhistoryalbum:

Muhammad Ali and Sam Cooke

Source: pinterest.com

roundbyroundboxing:

(via Floyd Mayweather and Boxing’s Bad Guy Persona)

My first article for roundbyroundboxing
It’s sincerely a privilege and honor.

roundbyroundboxing:

(via Floyd Mayweather and Boxing’s Bad Guy Persona)

My first article for roundbyroundboxing It’s sincerely a privilege and honor. Source: roundbyroundboxing.com

postracialcomments:

browngirlblues:

jestern2yx:

Every black child in grade school is taught Adolph Hitler killed six million Jews and is the worst human being that ever lived. On the other hand our children are taught “The Right Honorable” Cecil Rhodes the founder of the De Beer diamond company in South Africa who killed ten times that number of Africans is a hero and a statesman and if they study hard and do well in school they may be eligible to win Rhodes Scholarships the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship awards in the world. They don’t mention the scholarships are paid for with the blood of their ancestors.
-Rodney Jackson

Holy shit I never knew that about the Rhodes Scholarship

take note

postracialcomments:

browngirlblues:

jestern2yx:

Every black child in grade school is taught Adolph Hitler killed six million Jews and is the worst human being that ever lived. On the other hand our children are taught “The Right Honorable” Cecil Rhodes the founder of the De Beer diamond company in South Africa who killed ten times that number of Africans is a hero and a statesman and if they study hard and do well in school they may be eligible to win Rhodes Scholarships the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship awards in the world. They don’t mention the scholarships are paid for with the blood of their ancestors.

-Rodney Jackson

Holy shit I never knew that about the Rhodes Scholarship

take note

(via melancholyscholar-deactivated20)

Source: jestern2yx


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